Tears For Fears rules the world (or at least Indianapolis) in advance of first new album in a dozen years

Tears For Fears Photos by Andy Argyrakis

The very first voice coming out of Tears For Fears’ speakers at the Murat Theatre At Old National Centre wasn’t Roland Orzabal or Curt Smith but rather Lorde, who recently reworked “Everybody Wants To Rule The World” for an entirely new generation. Of course the guys quickly came out in the flesh and took charge of the tune, all but erasing the years between the ‘80s and now thanks to seamless harmonies, a well-lubed band and intricate arrangements that continue to resonate with the synthpop-appreciating masses.

Initial set closer “Head Over Heels” added to the pure alt-pop euphoria, while the standard closer “Shout” was the most electrifying, even prompting a few dancing ladies to crash stage left as they “let it all out” for a spontaneous end to an enthralling evening.

The somewhat rare Midwest tour stop came on the heels of the group’s appearance at the iHeartRadio Music Festival in Las Vegas alongside everyone from Sting to Britney Spears, Usher, Pitbull, Ariana Grande and Florida Georgia Line. And after about 85 minutes that breezed by in a blink, Tears For Fears simultaneously justified the prominent company it keeps, while also wetting everyone’s appetite for an entirely new album slated to drop on Warner Brothers sometime in 2017.

Tears For FearsIn the meantime, the band pined mostly from the classic collections “The Hurting” and “Songs From The Big Chair,” both of which earned lavish, deluxe edition reissues in the last few years, right up through 2004’s reunion record “Everybody Loves A Happy Ending.” With that in mind, the majority of the no frills night was spent addressing primary hits, including the Beatles-esque “Sowing The Seeds Of Love,” the ‘90s rocker “Break It Down Again” and the new waver “Pale Shelter.”

Prior to a suite of additional selections from “The Hurting,” Smith asked how familiar the album was to Americans and seemed taken aback by the thunderous response, further remarking how it’s probably much more appreciated now than when it first flew somewhat under the radar in 1983. That increased attention was especially warranted when Tears For Fears dusted off “Change,” “Mad World” and the deeper track “Memories Fade,” all of which sent experimental electronics on a blissful collision course with monster melodies.

Other surprises included a cover of Radiohead’s “Creep” (during which Orzabal effortlessly trumped Thom Yorke) and the jazzy jam “Badman’s Song” (a complete wildcard in the group’s catalogue). Initial set closer “Head Over Heels” added to the pure alt-pop euphoria, while the standard closer “Shout” was the most electrifying, even prompting a few dancing ladies to crash stage left as they “let it all out” for a spontaneous end to an enthralling evening.


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For additional information on Tears For Fears, visit TearsForFears.com.

For a list of upcoming shows at the Murat Theatre At Old National Centre, visit and OldNationalCentre.com and LiveNation.com.