Swedish House Mafia lights up the night for the last time

Swedish House Mafia Photo Provided by Polydor Records
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From forming in late 2008 through today, Swedish House Mafia’s rise to recognition has been nothing short of a rocket ride, at least as far as the EDM scene goes. Granted, the general population might not have a clue about this trio of DJs and producers, but after selling out Chicago’s cavernous United Center (a feat Lady Gaga’s recently aborted tour couldn’t even accomplish), it’s undeniable that the latest electronic music revival isn’t just an underground niche anymore.

But more than merely the grooves, Swedish House Mafia excelled with an eye-catching spectacle that could easily rival the laser-lined atmospheres of Pink Floyd’s peak.… If the trio insists on hanging up their hats, at least they’re going out on top of their game with a bang loud and bright enough to light up the night from “Miami 2 Ibiza.”

Swedish House Mafia

Photo by Andy Argyrakis

Adding additional fuel to the fire is the fact that Wednesday’s concert was part of the troupe’s “One Last Tour,” an over the top farewell that will clear the future calendars of Axwell, Steve Angello and Sebastian Ingrosso to work on solo projects. Both collectively and individually, these trendsetters are in high demand, as evidenced in the show’s diverse set list, which was split between originals and some of the hottest remixes to ever hit the club scene.

The unrelenting party was practically at full tilt for the entire two hour duration thanks to pulsating dance tracks like “Sunrise (Won’t Get Lost)” and “Here We Go,” which instantly transformed the arena into an all night rave. Come remixes of Coldplay’s “Every Teardrop Is a Waterfall” and Florence and The Machine’s “You’ve Got The Love,” the Windy City audience may as well have been at Miami’s Ultra Music Festival mainstay in all its tank top wearing, glow stick waving glory.

But more than merely the grooves, Swedish House Mafia excelled with an eye-catching spectacle that could easily rival the laser-lined atmospheres of Pink Floyd’s peak. Aside from endless beams of lights and strobes, there were also floor to ceiling Kraftwerk-styled projections (though the majority of fans in their teens and early twenties probably never heard of those electro pioneers), pyro that would’ve made an ’80s hair metal band proud and plenty of confetti come the group’s show stopper “Don’t You Worry Child.” If the trio insists on hanging up their hats, at least they’re going out on top of their game with a bang loud and bright enough to light up the night from “Miami 2 Ibiza.”